The Kyoto Distillery’s Production Method

The most popular and therefore most common way for producing gin is called the ‘one-shot’ distillation method; using this process the maker only distils their macerated liquid once.
KI NO BI Kyoto Dry Gin, however, is made with a particularly intricate production method: Botanicals are separated into six different categories (base, citrus, tea, herbal, spice and floral), each category is then macerated in rice spirit before being distilled individually. The distillates are then masterfully blended together before being left to marry together which allows the disparate flavours to harmonise, giving perfect balance in our gin. This elaborate process is rather unusual as it requires a considerable amount of additional time and effort. The majority of the gin distilleries around the world seldom use this complicated method. KI NO BI, however, simply cannot be created without this unusual yet highly sophisticated distillation practice.

Sourcing our ingredients

A selection of botanicals
harvested and collected from Kyoto and all over Japan

RICE
SPIRIT

The neutral spirit we use is made from rice; it has a luxurious and velvety texture that gives a delicious and smooth overall experience.


BOTANICAL

We source our botanicals in season, when they are at their best, and then store them to maintain optimum quality throughout the distilling year.

Maceration

We break our botanicals down into six different categories
and leave them to macerate in our rice spirit before distillation.

Distillation

We take the trouble to distill each category of botanicals separately.

The concept of ‘Konwa’ is key to KI NO BI; combining and creating harmony. Botanicals are separated into six different categories, each category is then steeped in rice spirit before being distilled individually. The distillates are then masterfully blended together before being left to marry which allows the disparate flavours to harmonise, giving perfect balance. This elaborate process ensures only the purest flavours and aromas offered by the exquisite botanicals are retained.

Blending

Blending the individual distillates back together again it ensures we only use the purest
and finest flavours and aromas offered by our exquisite botanicals.

Blending botanical distillates
(Konwa)
Fushimi water
Famed for its purity, softness and for its flavour.

We only use the purest and finest flavours and aromas offered by our exquisite botanicals

Maturation

After blending, the newest batch of KI NO BI is married with that of the previous week for several days to settle. This encourages consistency of flavour and balance as being hand-crafted and bearing in mind seasonality, inevitably there will be an element of variation from batch to batch. When our distillers feel it is ready, we remove half of the vatted spirit for bottling, leaving the other half behind to be blended with the next batch.

Maturation

Reduced in strength with Fushimi’s famed water.
We then leave the spirit to marry which allows the disparate flavours to harmonise, giving perfect balance.

Bottling

The oldest Karakami atelier in Japan, KIRA KARACHO, founded in Kyoto in 1624, is the source of the original Edo pattern which inspired the pattern on our label and pack. The image represents berries and fruit bringing our botanicals to mind.

Bottling

The Karakami design
produced by KIRA KARACHO

KI NO BI speaks of its place of origin, the soft, gentle and rounded flavour does justice to the culture of craftsmanship for which Kyoto has been famed for over a thousand years.